Why Dogs Bark at Night

Why Dogs Bark at Night

Dogs are not exactly nocturnal animals, but why is it that there are dogs that seem to want to shatter the silence of the night with their barking? They seem to be having the time of their life at the wrong time of your daily life. But do they just really bark at night for no reason? Or is there something that causes our pooches to yap or whine once the sun is out?
That’s what we’ll find out here.
What Causes Nighttime Barking
First off, let’s keep in mind that not all dogs bark at night. There are dogs that are either active or reactive at night – or both.
More prominent noises – Noises are easier to hear at nightfall, and these noises become even magnified. Aside from their strong sense of smell, dogs have a superior sense of hearing compared to humans, and they can detect sounds at frequencies we can’t even begin to detect unless we use certain audio machines. So when a dog hears a noise he perceives as a threat or a distraction, he reacts to it by barking.
Nocturnal critters – There are creatures that are active or most active during the night. These include bats, mice, skunks and raccoons. So instead of hitting the proverbial pillow, some of our furry friends decide it’s best to do some nighttime vocalization when they hear these critters flying or scurrying around.
First-night jitters – Pups who are brought to a new home and are separated from their mum (and siblings) usually make a lot of noise on the first few nights in their new abode – and this can drive not only you but your neighbors crazy. Newly adopted pups haven’t learned to sleep through the night yet, so expect them to bark like mad all night.
Confinement distress – That’s just a fancy term for anxiety for being inside of a crate or a very small room. If some humans have claustrophobia (fear of confined spaces), there are dogs who don’t want to be kept in a crate or a confined space overnight. This can trigger them to bark non-stop.

How to Stop Dog Barking at Night
The first step is to remove what triggers their barking. If it’s nighttime creatures or undetected urban noises that keep them up at night, put him in a room where he can’t hear those noises, or at least a space where the noises would be muffled.
If you’re up to it, you can also have him sleep beside you, especially if it’s a newly adopted pup.
If the barking persists, we suggest using the Petking Anti-Bark Collar. This bark-control collar is safe and humane. it doesn’t use any irritating spray or harmful electroshocks. It simply emits progressive sounds and vibrations to let your  furry friend know that his barking is undesirable.
Don’t let the nighttime barking add more dark circles around your eyes. Teach your dog how to be quiet so you can start fully enjoying your bedtime again.

Photos: use those two with a man in the bad & dark window and dog barking